A story steeped with history & creole culture

The 18th century European designed Andrew Jackson Hotel is a true local treasure, steps away from swinging jazz clubs, world-class restaurants, and the lively bars of Bourbon Street. Proudly listed on the National Register of Historic Places, our townhouse-style property stands out among hotels in New Orleans' French Quarter, with iconic wrought iron balconies, soothing tropical courtyards. Rife with Old World furnishings and Southern hospitality, we believe guests feel at home when they're treated like family. That's why we offer complimentary silver tray breakfasts delivered daily to your room, and free Wi-Fi throughout the hotel.

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Boarding School & Courthouse

The grounds of the Andrew Jackson Hotel have seen its fair share of history and tragedy. The site was originally a boarding school and orphanage for boys who had lost their parents to Yellow Fever, opening its doors in 1792. The fires that consumed much of New Orleans in 1774 also laid rest to the boarding school with five young boys inside. After the fire, a U.S. Federal Courthouse was almost immediately built and remained there until before the turn of the 20th Century, where General Andrew Jackson, who later became the seventh U.S. president, was held in contempt of court and charged with obstruction of justice. The courthouse was demolished and the current building was erected in 1890.

General Andrew Jackson

The Andrew Jackson Hotel is the site of the U.S. Federal Courthouse made famous for fining then-General Andrew Jackson for contempt of court in 1815. Jackson had arrived to New Orleans in December 1814 to bolster the city’s defenses against a possible British invasion. He declared martial law against the British as a military defense. Regardless of a great victory against the British at the Battle of New Orleans the following January, Jackson refused to lift the order months afterward. When a senator expressed his unease about the order, Jackson had him arrested. When a judge ruled that the senator be arrested, Jackson ordered the judge to be held in jail. When Jackson eventually lifted the martial law, the judge returned and charged Jackson with contempt of court to the tune of $1,000, which Jackson paid.

Ghosts?

The Andrew Jackson Hotel is known as one of the most haunted hotels in New Orleans. The property saw its share of misfortunes. Originally home to a boarding school and orphanage for boys who lost their parents to the Yellow Fever epidemic, the site housed a grave tragedy in 1774. Fires that consumed many of the buildings in the French Quarter burned down the orphanage, with five young boys inside. Today, many say the building is haunted, with reports of the ghost of young “Armand,” waking up guests with laughter or pushing them out of the bed. Others report seeing the caretaker of the orphan boys fluffing pillows and cleaning up the rooms, others claim that Andrew Jackson roams the hallways. We invite guests to come and decide on their own if the building really is haunted.

Guests have claimed that the ghosts of the young boys can be heard laughing and playing in the courtyard at night.

The Hotel today

The Andrew Jackson Hotel stands today as a significant part of U.S. history built before the turn of the 20th Century. This local treasure is chock-full of antiquity while offering modern amenities such as complimentary silver tray breakfasts, delivered daily to your room and free Wi-Fi throughout the hotel. Just steps away from swinging jazz clubs, world-class restaurants, the lively bars of Bourbon Street and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, our townhouse-style property stands out among the other hotels in New Orleans' French Quarter, with its iconic wrought-iron balconies and soothing, tropical courtyards.